Google+ British Cricketer Michael Vaughan | Cricket Freaks

British Cricketer Michael Vaughan

by on November 22, 2012
in Profiles

Share Your Thoughts

British Cricketer Michael Vaughan Michael Paul Vaughan, a retired cricketer hailing from England was born on 29 October 1974. As a batsman, Vaughn was predominantly an excellent batsman in the test format. He started his professional career in 1993 and gained significant approbation as a captain of the England Under-19 cricket team, touring against Sri Lanka the same year. He was declared one of the finest batsmen in the world after his excellent performance in 2002/3 Ashes, in which he made 633 runs and 3 centuries. He captained England between 2003 and 2008, in 51 tests making a national record by winning 26 matches and losing only 11. In 2004 England succeeded in winning all seven home Tests of the summer season under Vaughan’s able leadership. In the 2005 Ashes, England achieved a victory of 2-1 under his captaincy. A smart right-handed player Vaughan was popular for his intelligent captaincy and man-management expertise. He made his entrance in Test cricket for England in South Africa in November 1999, representing his country as its 600th player. He made his first Test Century against Pakistan, in May 2001 and in 2002 he scored 900 runs against Sri Lanka and India in seven Tests. He scored highest innings against India at Nottingham during the second Test where he took 3 wickets also. At Melbourne during the fourth test he made 145 runs, and in Sydney in the fifth and final Test he made 183 runs before being wrongfully declared ‘lbw’. Overall Vanguard scored 1,481 Test runs in 2002 and according to the ICC rankings he has been declared as the number one batsman in the world. In 82 test matches of his career, he socred 5,719 runs at an average of 41.44 including 18 centuries and 18 fifties. His status as a batsman helped England become a very successful test team during the captaincy of Vaughan. In 86 ODI matches of his career, Vaughan scored 1982 runs including 16 fifties and no century. Vaughan clearly was meant for test format and there he actually delivered in a very convincing way.

Share Your Thoughts

Google+
You might also likeclose